• Sen. Elizabeth Warren visits metro Atlanta on campaign stop

    By: Rikki Klaus

    Updated:

    GWINNETT COUNTY, Ga. - Sen. Elizabeth Warren was in the metro Atlanta area Saturday afternoon to campaign for her 2020 presidential bid.

    The Democratic presidential candidate made a stop at Central Gwinnett High School in Lawrenceville, where she fired up voters at her first rally in Georgia.

    Channel 2's Rikki Klaus was at the event, where Warren was the first candidate running in 2020 to make a stop in Georgia. 

    A spokeswoman for Warren's campaign said 1,100 people came to hear the senator speak. 

    She advocated for a government that works for all people, and said that will take sweeping reform. 

    "This country is our future!" Warren said as the crowd cheered. 

    The Democrat from Massachusetts told the crowd that the country has gotten richer, but wages have stayed the same. 


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    When our federal government in Washington is working great only for the rich and the powerful, that’s corruption, plain and simple," Warren said. 

    Warren announced that she has the biggest anti-corruption proposal since Watergate.

    She also spoke out about racial issues by pointing out the gap between white and black home ownership. 

    "It is time to say that race matters," Warren said. "We've got to call it out, and we've got to make real change."

    That message spoke to attendee Maya Brooks. 

    “(I want) a candidate who can fight for better home ownership, fight against redlining, fight against the policies that stop people of color from succeeding in America," Brooks said. 

    Brooks and classmate Mollie Marlow stood in line to get their photo taken with Warren. 

    "She's definitely got my vote," Marlow said. 

    Eric Jonelunas wasn't so sure, but he appreciated Warren coming to his town. 

    "It's way too early to say an absolute yes right now, but she came here, so that's definitely a one-up," Jonelunas said. 

    In an interview after her stump speech, Klaus asked Warren about identifying as a Native American in the past. 

    "I shouldn't have done it. I am not a person of color," Warren said. "I am not a tribal citizen, and I've apologized."

    Warren plans to wrap up this seven-state tour in Nevada and California.

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