Here’s what happened with Georgia’s U.S. House seats that were up for grabs

Here’s what happened with Georgia’s U.S. House seats that were up for grabs
FILE - This Monday, Nov. 2, 2020, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol building in Washington (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) (Patrick Semansky)

While the Senate seats haven’t been decided, Georgia elected four new members and 10 incumbents to the U.S. House of Representatives Tuesday night.

The 7th District, 9th District and 14th District will have new representatives after Rep. Rob Woodall, Rep. Doug Collins and Rep. Tom Graves did not run for re-election.

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There is also a new representative for the 5th Congressional District to succeed the late Rep. John Lewis.

Live election coverage continues now on Channel 2 Action News This Morning.

Marjorie Taylor Greene, who gained national attention for being QAnon follower and has made several controversial comments in her run for Congress, won Georgia’s 14th District. She won the seat previously held by Rep. Tom Graves, who retired this year.

Republican Andrew Clyde defeated Democrat Devin Pandy in Georgia’s 9th Congressional District previously held by Collins. Collins conceded in the U.S. Senate race, which will come down to Kelly Loeffler and Raphael Warnock.

Carolyn Bordeaux, who ran for Georgia’s 7th District in 2018, claimed victory in the race this year over Republican Rich McCormick.

In the 5th District, Democrat Nikema Williams will succeed her mentor Rep. John Lewis. Williams was selected to run for Lewis' seat, who won the June primary but died in July following a battle with cancer.

U.S Rep. Lucy McBath won her re-election to the Georgia’s 6th Congressional District in a closely-watched rematch with Republican Karen Handel.

The following incumbents also won re-election for the remaining districts: Buddy Carter, Sanford Bishop, Drew Ferguson, Hank Johnson, Austin Scott, Jody Hice, Barry Loudermilk, Rick Allen and David Scott.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

EXPLAINER: Georgia's role in the Senate Balance of Power