• New subpoena shows federal corruption probe into Atlanta City Hall has broadened

    By: Aaron Diamant

    Updated:

    ATLANTA - Channel 2 Action News investigative reporter Aaron Diamant has learned a new subpoena confirms the federal corruption probe into Atlanta City Hall has widened.

    Federal authorities want to see records for every member of former Mayor Kasim Reed's cabinet, documents show.

    For years now, our reporting has shown the federal corruption probe into Atlanta City Hall focused on

    Former Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed used his city-backed credit card to charge more than $331,000 from 2015-2017. He refunded $13,400 from personal or campaign accounts while he was in office, and about $12,000 from a personal account in March.
    Former Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed used his city-backed credit card to charge more than $331,000 from 2015-2017. He refunded $13,400 from personal or campaign accounts while he was in office, and about $12,000 from a personal account in March.
    ALYSSA POINTER / ALYSSA.POINTER@AJC.COM
    contracting and spending. But after filing an open records request, we discovered a new federal grand jury subpoena that shows the feds are now zeroing in on Reed’s inner circle.

    [CONTINUING COVERAGE: Atlanta City Hall investigation]

    The feds now want to see records for every member of Reed’s cabinet since January 2014 and for cabinet members who served during the first two weeks of Keisha Lance Bottoms’ administration.

    The grand jury subpoena, dated just last week, orders the city to produce documents related to cabinet members’ requests and approvals for any type of leave.


    TRENDING STORIES:


    It also asks for all records related to any payouts for that leave. 

    The feds’ probe began at least four years ago. 

    Four people have already gone to prison on bribery-related charges, including the city’s former procurement director and two contractors. 

    A fifth person is awaiting trial.

    This is at least the ninth subpoena in the federal probe.

    We've already spoken with several of our sources and local legal experts as we work to understand more about what specifically the feds might be after, as well as the potential fallout. 
     

    Next Up: