Governor declares State of Emergency after Grady water pipe burst

Mobile hospital unit to be provided from North Carolina

Governor declares State of Emergency after Grady water pipe burst
A 2-foot water pipe burst inside Grady Memorial Hospital on December 7.

ATLANTA — Gov. Brian Kemp has declared a State of Emergency in Fulton County as a result of damage at Grady Memorial Hospital caused by a burst pipe last Saturday.

The designation will legally allow the governor to activate the Georgia Emergency Management Agency so it can bring in a mobile hospital unit room from North Carolina.

We expect more details about the emergency declaration at a news conference later today with leaders from GEMA, Grady, and the state Department of Public Health.

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The 24-inch water pipe burst Saturday afternoon, causing flooding on the sixth floor of the medical center. Repairs to the pipe are complete, but the hospital suffered water damage on three floors and electrical issues, Grady officials said in a statement.

It could take up to three months before repairs are completed.

The 24-inch water pipe burst Saturday afternoon, causing flooding on the sixth floor of the medical center. Repairs to the pipe are complete, but the hospital suffered water damage on three floors and electrical issues, Grady officials said in a statement.

The hospital also transferred 150 of its 700 patients to other medical centers; many of those transfers have already been completed.

Grady officials said they will continue to divert serious patients to other facilities and work with the doctors at those other locations.

Read the full statement from Grady Memorial Hospital:

"Beginning at 7am on Friday, December 13, Grady will begin accepting trauma, stroke, and burn patients only.

Grady will immediately assume the role of operating the Atlanta Metro EMS coordination center. All ambulances transporting adult patients to hospitals within the perimeter (I-285) will contact this coordination center. Centralizing the coordination of Metro Atlanta EMS Services will ensure patients are being transported to the appropriate facilities based on their medical needs.

By phasing off diversion and opening our doors to trauma, stroke and burn patients, Grady will again be able to provide the critical services other hospitals and the community rely on Grady for. And we hope to relieve some of the burden experienced by other metro Atlanta hospitals during our current facility crisis."