Children too young to be vaccinated should focus on having a healthy immune system, doctor says

ATLANTA — A local doctor said parents should work to keep their children’s immune systems in great condition to keep COVID-19 from entering their homes.

A family practice physician, Dr. Cecil Bennett, spoke with Channel 2′s Wendy Corona about what parents should do to protect their children who are too young to receive the vaccine.

“They’re not little people; they’re children,” said Bennett.

Bennett sees this as an opportunity to create a foundation in our youngest that can help strengthen their immune system and also create good habits for adulthood.

“Children who eat fruits and vegetables when they’re children will continue to eat fruits and vegetables when they become adults,” said Bennett.

Bennett believes nutrition from natural foods is always better than the same nutrients in pill or powder form. He called it a building block for a strong immune system.

“This is a great opportunity to try and get them outside more and get them out of the mask and more active and moving,” said Bennett.

TRENDING STORIES:

However, with the increased activity, adequate sleep is required for a growing child. Eight to 10 hours of sleep daily are recommended for children. The proper amount of rest combined with a nutritious diet and proper activity can boost a child’s immune system.

A strong immune system coupled with mask-wearing, hand-washing and social distancing should work in keeping children and their families healthy.

“This may be an opportunity for the entire family to be actively involved in nutrition to boost all our immune systems,” said Bennett.

A big concern that remains is asymptomatic children who may transmit COVID-19 to an unvaccinated adult. Bennett said the focus should be on vaccinating those who are eligible.