Atlanta

Georgia’s film industry taking a hit as actors join writers on strike

ATLANTA — Actors and writers are both on the picket lines and Georgia’s film industry is starting to feel the impacts.

About 3,700 actors and writers who call the Peach State home are joining the strike for higher pay.

This all started with the writers’ strike, but the actors’ union has now voted to join them.

Channel 2′s Bryan Mims spoke with business owners who say they support the film industry and the strike has left them struggling.

[DOWNLOAD: Free WSB-TV News app for alerts as news breaks]

Productions spent nearly $4.5 billion dollars in the state during the fiscal year 2022.

“Business has definitely slowed down since the writers’ strike went into effect,” Matt Davis, owner of Reel Supplies in East Point said.

Davis says his business provides building materials for production sets. Even though work has dried up since the strike, he is keeping all of his employees on the payroll.

People who work in the industry say that even though there’s a halt in production, they believe business will come roaring back.

“Get our inventory back up to speed for when it comes back because I truly believe it’ll come back very strong. And there are a lot of big projects in the pipeline. And I know that they’re coming to Georgia once we get through this,” Davis explained.

TRENDING STORIES:

He says that’s why it’s essential to keep Georgia’s tax incentives.

Kelsey Moore of the Georgia Screen Entertainment Coalition says the strike is far-reaching.

“It’s a reminder of how important it is to keep our industry stable, and we are ready to bounce back as soon as production does resume,” Moore said.

She says it’s hurting an array of businesses that serve the industry, everything from restaurants to dry cleaners. She says she believes the state is in a good spot once the strike ends.

“Film production wants to come to Georgia. So if we can keep all that stable, as soon as that resume, it’s all gonna come back here,” she said.

The number of active productions in Georgia right now is in the 20s. That number is typically in the 30s or 40s.

[SIGN UP: WSB-TV Daily Headlines Newsletter]