Atlanta rapper YFN Lucci surrenders in gang racketeering case

ATLANTA — Channel 2 Action News has learned Atlanta-rapper YFN Lucci has surrendered in the gang racketeering case we told you about almost two weeks ago.

Fulton County Sheriff Pat Labat told Channel 2 investigative reporter Mark Winne that Lucci is housed in the Fulton County Jail in a way that keeps both him and the staff safe.

“We do treat charges more so than the celebrity status and he is certainly in our maximum security area,” Labat said.

Labat told Winne if some of his deputies and detention officers want to see Lucci, whose real name is Rayshawn Bennett, they don’t need to watch him on YouTube. Labat’s folks can keep tabs on him the same way they watch other Fulton County Jail inmates — on the surveillance video monitors in the jail.

Lucci has been housed there since surrendering May 10 on a gang-related RICO indictment, involving allegations of felony murder and more.

“He’s not guilty of all charges,” Lucci’s attorney Drew Findling said.

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Documents Winne obtained reveal even before the racketeering indictment of 12 people, a battle was shaping up over whether Lucci, an alleged Blood gang associate, should be out on bond.

“Is YFN Lucci a member or an associate of any criminal street gang?” Winne asked Findling.

“No. He’s not a gang member. What he is, is an internationally recognized musical artist that is a triple platinum winner,” Findling said.

Documents indicate the racketeering case filed April 30 involves, among other things, the felony murder of James Adams, in which Lucci is accused along with two others.

Lucci had already been charged in connection with that homicide in January.

Atlanta police say Lucci and three gang members traveled to an area dominated by a rival gang. Lucci was driving the car when Adams and a front-seat passenger fired multiple shots. Adams was hit by return fire and was put out of the vehicle a short distance away.

Findling maintains the felony murder charge against Lucci involves an allegation that Lucci was driving his Maybach with some friends when someone shot at the car, someone in the back seat defensively returned fire, and because a passenger in Lucci’s car was killed, Lucci was charged with felony murder — which Findling says he’s absolutely not guilty of.

Documents indicate both sides agreed to a bond on the homicide charge, but on April 12, before the filing of the racketeering indictment, a prosecutor moved to revoke Lucci’s bond, alleging he routinely violated the conditions.

Lucci’s side argued, “There appears to be no rational basis for asking for any additional bond,” and asked the court to allow his bond to remain in place.

Findling said felony murder occurs when someone unintentionally causes a death during the commission of a felony. He maintains Lucci was not committing a felony.

Before the racketeering indictment, Winne learned that Lucci had a $500,000 bond for a total of four charges.