• 5 things to know about Flag Day

    By: Cox Media Group National Content Desk

    Updated:

    Flag Day is celebrated annually in the U.S. on June 14. Here are some key things to know about the holiday.

    1.) How did Flag Day originate?

    Flag Day has a long history and began on the local level. Its origins date back to 1885, when a schoolteacher in Wisconsin had his class honor “Flag Birthday” on June 14 to mark the anniversary of the Flag Resolution of 1777. From there, communities across the country began to mark the day.

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    2.) When did Flag Day become a national holiday?

    In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson made a presidential proclamation, which officially established Flag Day. It was not until 1949, however, that President Harry Truman signed an act of Congress designating June 14 as Flag Day.

    3.) What does Flag Day commemorate?

    Flag Day marks the official adoption of the American flag that flies all over the country today. The Flag Resolution of 1777 declared, in part: "Resolved, That the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation."

    4.) How is Flag Day celebrated?

    People are encouraged to display the American flag at homes and businesses on June 14. Some communities hold parades and other celebrations honoring the flag.

    5.) Where can I learn more about the American flag?

    The United States Code devotes an entire section to the Flag Code, which covers how citizens should respectfully display and treat the American flag.

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