• See Halloween lights, costumes, pumpkins, haunted houses

    By: Nelson Hicks

    Updated:

    ATLANTA,None - The pumpkins are carved, costumes picked out and the scary music is ready to play.

    Halloween is finally here.

    Halloween has gone from a night simply about getting candy to big business. CNN notes U.S. consumers spent more than $2.5 billion on costumes this year and that the average household has spent $21.05 in Halloween candy alone.

    Need something to get you in the Halloween mood? Take a look at this house decorated for Halloween.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfcNoMnKjrY

    The home is in Riverside, Calif., but it isn't the first time the homeowner has decorated like this. Here's the 2010 house.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUAV_1jBJB4&feature=related

    A little closer to home, haunted houses are a big draw in the Atlanta area. There's Chamber of Horrors behind the Masquerade downtown, 13 Acres of Hell in Conyers and Fear The Woods in Stockbridge, to name a few.

    Nelson's News on wsbtv.com visited a couple of haunted houses this year.

    Walk though 13 Stories Haunted House in Kennesaw.

    http://bcove.me/caz9hxo6

    Or, meet the mad scientists at Netherworld in Norcross.

    http://bcove.me/8rvwb0rl

    If you haven't picked out a costume or carved your pumpkin yet, it's probably a little too late for these ideas, but take a look anyway.

    GALLERY: Crazy Costumes, cool pumpkins

    And finally, if you don't have plans for the big night, check out some of the events going on around the Atlanta area.

    LINK: Halloween events

    Enjoy the night!

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