• Sheriff's Association says it will not support medical marijuana bill

    Updated:

    ATLANTA - Channel 2 Action News has learned some in the law enforcement community are now coming out against Georgia's medical marijuana bill.
     
    It was on a fast track to getting passed.
     
    The bill looks different this year because it's not just about giving kids with severe seizure disorders access to cannabis oil.
     
    Prosecutors and sheriffs in Georgia say the expanded access means they can't support it.
     
    “I have great respect for our sheriffs and our DAs in our state,” said state Sen. Allen Peake, the bill’s sponsor. “I'm proposing cannabis oil only that can't be smoked; very low in THC.”
     
    THC is the chemical the plant produces that can get users high.
     
    Peake told Channel 2’s Lori Geary the bill would not only provide immunity from prosecution for parents of kids with severe seizure disorders, but has also added other conditions, including cancer, Lou Gehrig's disease,  multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, AIDS, Parkinson's disease and sickle cell anemia.
     
    Terry Norris, with the members of Georgia’s Sheriffs Association, says if it were just limited to children and adults with seizure disorders, they would not oppose it.
     
    Georgia's prosecutors took a similar stance this week.
     
    “But if it's low THC and doesn't get you high, how could that get you on the road to legalizing recreational marijuana?” Geary asked Norris.
     
    “I think it's the expanded use, period. They agreed to that one element, and that element has expanded. So where is the expansion going from here?” Norris said.
     
    “I hope you're ready to go visit with the cancer patient who is in the middle of the ravages of chemo and tell them, ‘Well, we don't think your condition should be included on the list for cannabis oil that may provide you relief from your pain and suffering.’ I sure wouldn't want to be in their shoes when they deliver that message to that cancer patient,” Peake said.
     
    “I admire him for his passion, it's just a difference of opinion,” Norris said.


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