POLLEN PROBLEMS: Got allergies? Here are your options

The extremely high tree pollen counts will finally come to an end in the next one to two weeks, but that's not the end for allergy sufferers.

ATLANTA — The extremely high tree pollen counts will finally come to an end in the next one to two weeks, but that's not the end for allergy sufferers. Grass pollen will then begin to go up. That means the sniffling and sneezing will linger a while longer.

The remedies that work for your neighbor, however, may not work for you.

“It really depends on the type of symptoms that you’re having, so different medications will help different symptoms,” explains Dr. Karen Hoffmann with Piedmont ENT & Related Allergy.

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She explained to Severe Weather Team 2 Meteorologist Katie Walls that when it comes to allergy medications, it's not one size fits all.

“If your symptoms are predominately runny nose, drippy nose, sneezing or itching, then you’ll usually do better with an oral antihistamine, such as Claritin, Zyrtex, or Allegra,” said Dr. Hoffmann.

If you have nasal congestion, ear fullness, and facial pressure, you’re going to want something different.

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“Things like nasal steroid sprays, Flonase, Nasacort, rhinocort or Flonase sentimist will decrease the congestion in your nose and help you breathe better,” suggested Dr. Hoffmann.

Pharmacist Ira Katz at Little Five Points Pharmacy suggests the store brand to save a few bucks.

Regardless of what antihistamine you choose, remember to drink plenty of water.

“Antihistamines dry you out but then you’re perspiring so hydration, hydration, hydration,” said

Katz.Walls visited his pharmacy to learn natural remedies work best.

“There are some wonderful homeopathic products for allergies,” said Katz.

One of those natural remedies is called Sabadil Allergy Relief.

“It’s a combination of several different homeopathic ingredients that might help,” said Katz.

Another herbal product Katz recommends is D-Hist.

When you come in from outside, Katz and Hoffmann recommend rinsing off in the shower. Neti pots and sinus sprays and rinses can flush pollen particles out of your nose.

If you’re extremely congested, you might need a decongestant, but be honest with your pharmacist or doctor, and follow the label. Some nasal decongestants after three days can end up making your symptoms even worse.

Also, some medications shouldn’t be used if you’re on high blood pressure medication or have heart disease.

“Communicate before you medicate,” reminded Katz.