• Chick-fil-A no longer funding Salvation Army, Fellowship of Christian Athletes

    By: Tim Darnell, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Updated:

    ATLANTA - Atlanta-based Chick-Fil-A has stopped donating to The Salvation Army and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, two organizations that have come under fire from LGBTQ activists.

    The company told the Thomson Reuters Foundation it has stopped donating to the organizations on Monday, according to CNBC.

    Both organizations oppose same-sex marriage. 

    Chick-fil-A President and COO Tim Tassopoulos also told Bisnow the Paul Anderson Youth Home in Vidalia, Georgia, would no longer be funded by the company.

    “There’s no question we know that, as we go into new markets, we need to be clear about who we are,” Tassopoulos told Bisnow. “There are lots of articles and newscasts about Chick-fil-A, and we thought we needed to be clear about our message.” 


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    Anderson, a Toccoa, Georgia, native, started the home after he won Olympic gold in Melbourne, Australia, in weightlifting.  

    In 2012, then-Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy told a Baptist website the Atlanta-based restaurant chain is "guilty as charged" in its support of traditional marriage. Cathy is now CEO of the company, which has become the third-largest fast food chain in the nation and one that consistently ranks high on numerous customer-satisfaction surveys.

    A Chick-fil-A restaurant that opened in the United Kingdom amid protests against the company’s opposition to same-sex marriage will close when its lease expires in 2020.

    Tassopoulos said in 2020 the Chick-fil-A Foundation will give $9 million to organizations such as Junior Achievement USA, Covenant House International and community food banks for its hunger initiative in each city where it operates. 

    This report was written by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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