• Single-use plastic items could soon be banned at Atlanta's airport

    By: Dave Huddleston

    Updated:

    ATLANTA - Travelers might soon see fewer plastic bags, cups, straws and Styrofoam at Atlanta's airport. 

    An Atlanta city councilman is proposing legislation that would ban single-use plastics at city owned buildings. That includes Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

    “This is one step the city of Atlanta can take," Amir Farokhi told Channel 2’s Dave Huddleston. 

    Ten other council members have co-sponsored the bill and Atlanta could follow in the footsteps of San Francisco, which banned single-use plastic water bottles sales at its airport.

    [RELATED: Fulton County will soon ban single-use plastics]

    Farokhi told Huddleston he believes it’s time for Atlanta to be leader in eliminating these items.

    “I was at the airport last week. I bought a meal from a concessionaire and they gave me a plastic bag to carry my food literally 15 feet to where the tables were. I remember thinking I really didn't need this plastic bag," he said.


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    Farokhi also wants the city to work with private businesses to eliminate the use of plastic at places like grocery stores. 

    "These are some of the things the city can do to lead the way on sustainability. The private sector is already leading the way. Some retailers are moving towards a no plastic bag model," he said.

    According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s site, officials are most concerned about plastics harming America's waters and environment. 

    Farokhi said eliminating the city's plastics use could do a lot to help.

    "Whether it's individuals and how we choose to live at home, or the public sector or the private sector, we all have a role to play and this is one small thing the city can be doing."

    Huddleston spoke with travelers at Hartsfield-Jackson about the proposal. Angela and Antonio Jackson had dinner while they waited for their daughter.

    “First of all, how would I drink out of my cup here, and eat my food? I don’t see why they should ban it. I’m against it," Angela Jackson said. 

    The ban isn't a done deal just yet.  

    It still has to makes its way through two government committees and then back to the full council before the mayor can sign it into law. 

    Public hearings will start next week. 

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