“Sweep the Hooch” returns for 10th year to help clean up Chattahoochee River

“Sweep the Hooch” returns for 10th year to help clean up Chattahoochee River

Hundreds of people spent their Saturday making sure a river Georgians depend on stays clean during the annual “Sweep the Hooch” event.

Every year, people walk while others use kayaks and canoes to pick up trash at one of 40 sites along the Chattahoochee River. The event is celebrating a big milestone as this is the 10th year for the clean-up.

Channel 2 Action News saw volunteers hard at work by Boyd Elementary in northwest Atlanta.

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“We actually have waders in the creeks as well and we have paddlers who are travelling 3-5 sections of the rivers to get trash out,” outings manager Tammy Bates said.

Bates said there were 400 people when they first started Sweep the Hooch. Now they’ve grown to 1,000 volunteers every year.

The event did require previous registration to attend. Volunteers were required to bring and wear their own masks while staying the recommended six feet apart for social distancing.

The Chattahoochee Riverkeeper says even if you didn’t get to attend Saturday’s event, there are other ways to help keep the river clean:

  • Explore the river on your own and pick up trash along the way.
  • Be careful what you flush. Never flush paper towels or so called “flushable” wipes. Only toilet paper should be flushed.
  • Donate online and share your favorite site along the Chattahoochee River

Here’s more details about the river’s impact in Georgia.

Last year more than 1,100 volunteers collected a record-setting 32 tons of trash in just one day. The river drains an area of 8,770 square miles and is the most heavily used water resource in Georgia.

The Chattahoochee River is one of the smallest river systems in the entire country to provide water supply to a major metropolitan city.

Here’s more details about the river’s impact in Georgia.

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