Woman describes encounter with alleged serial flasher

by: Mike Petchenik Updated:

FULTON COUNTY, Ga. - A north Fulton County woman is recounting a bizarre encounter with a man who police describe as a serial flasher.
 
David Kiehl, 53, is accused of exposing himself and performing a sex act in front of two teenagers on Holcomb Bridge Road last week as they sat in their mother’s car.  Police have charged the Canton man with indecent exposure and child molestation. Kiehl remains in the Fulton County Jail without bond.
 
In December 2012, another Roswell woman told Channel 2’s Mike Petchenik she witnessed the same behavior when she stopped at a light at the intersection of North Point Parkway and Mansell Road in Alpharetta.
 
“I look over at the car next to me and the guy has his window down and I thought that was kind of strange,” said the woman, who asked Petchenik to conceal her identity.  “I looked further and the guy wasn’t wearing any pants.”
 
The woman said she noticed Kiehl touching himself and laughing, so she snapped a picture of him on her cell phone and e-mailed the picture to Alpharetta police.  A year later, she said detectives called and asked her to pick Kiehl out of a photo lineup.
 
“You don’t forget a face like that,” she said.
 
Petchenik first reported Thursday that Kiehl has been convicted three times for indecent exposure dating back to the early 90s in Cobb, Fulton and DeKalb Counties. 
 
He was out of jail on bond from a July 2013 flashing incident in Dunwoody and Alpharetta police had an active warrant for his arrest stemming from the 2012 incident. 

Kiehl’s attorney, Andrew Fiddes, said his client has pleaded not guilty to the charge and is “not a danger to society.”
 
“He’s been doing it for 20 years,” the victim told Petchenik. “He needs help. He’s a ‘whack job.’”
 
Dr. Andrew Gothard, with Atlanta Pyschological Services in Chamblee, said Kiehl could suffer from a disorder called “exhibitionism.”
 
“By definition, exhibitionism includes individuals who have intense sexual urges, fantasies and behaviors of exposing themselves, exposing their private parts to unsuspecting strangers,” said Gothard.
 
Gothard said the disorder is a compulsion like gambling or drug abuse that can only be helped with targeted therapy designed to help the patient understand what triggers the behavior and how to cope when they have an urge.
 
“We can have the best therapies in the world,” he said.  “But we can never predict how any individual client or patient is going to react to therapy.”



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