Trayvon Martin death prompts 'Hoodie Day' demonstration

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ATLANTA - Several local churches took part in National "Hoodie Day," prompted by the death of a Florida teenager who was shot by a neighborhood watchman.

Trayvon Martin was wearing a hoodie the night he was killed, so Sunday churchgoers wore hoodies to remember him, religious leaders said.

The shooting that occurred last month continues to spark outrage, as critics say that the watchman, George Zimmerman, was following Martin because he was black and wearing a hoodie. Civil rights activists are among those calling for Zimmerman's arrest.

"Many people wear hoodies. Athletes wear hoodies. There are people walking the streets, walking dogs. Hoodies are not germane to crime and illegal activities," the Rev. Darryl Winston of Greater Works Assembly said.

The Greater Works Assembly and Ebenezer Baptist Church both took part in the demonstration.

The demonstration comes after a new witness spoke out about what happened the night the teen was killed. ABC News talked to an eyewitness, who said Martin actually attacked Zimmerman.

That unidentified witness said Zimmerman was screaming for help, and the teen was on top, remarks that support Zimmerman's explanation that he fired in self-defense.

Authorities said the neighborhood watch volunteer has not been seen since the shooting, but he did leave the following message on a friend's voicemail:

"I appreciate it, and you're truly setting an example for me for the future of, uh, doing the right thing, even when it's tough, and uh, I appreciate it. I'll talk to you soon. Thanks."

ABC is also reporting that another one of Zimmerman's friends said the voice heard screaming on a 911 call is Zimmerman.



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