Sneiderman in battle over Rusty's insurance money

by: John Bachman Updated:

DEKALB COUNTY, Ga. —

Dunwoody widow Andrea Sneiderman is fighting with her murdered husband's family over $2 million. It's Rusty Sneiderman's insurance money.

Hemy Neuman is in jail for killing Rusty Sneiderman. Andrea Sneiderman is in jail for lying about a relationship with Neuman.

Friday, a judge told both sides to, "cool things down."

"As hotly contested as I'm sure this whole issue is for both of your clients, you all have got to bring the clear cool heads to the table," said Fulton County Judge Doris Downs.

The insurance money has been frozen by the DeKalb County District Attorney for more than a year as prosecutors accused Andrea Sneiderman of murdering her husband Rusty.

"Representatives of that office swore under oath that Andrea Sneiderman was guilty of murder," said Sneiderman's attorney Mark Trigg.

As Channel 2 Action News reported, those prosecutors dropped the murder charge right before her trial.

"When it came time to put up or shut up...and prove the allegations before a jury, they shut up," Trigg said.

Friday, prosecutors officially dropped the forfeiture action of that $2.2 million in insurance money.

"There is no legal basis as of this point in time for the money to remain frozen," Trigg said.

However, with Andrea Sneiderman's parents in the courtroom, at times her mother was crying, her attorney did not get a win, at least not yet.

"She does not appear to be suffering or in grave need for these funds," said Esther Panitch, the attorney for Rusty Sneiderman's family.

She argued for the judge to re-freeze the money, pending the wrongful death lawsuit against Andrea Sneiderman.

"She has literally sacrificed others to obtain Russel Sneiderman's property and without intervention she'll continue to act in furtherance of ultimate goal,which is to keep as much money of his as possible and away from her children," Panitch said.

So after two hours in court, the judge ultimately signed two motions. First, unfreezing the money and then re-freezing it for another 90 days.

She urged both sides to use the time to settle so that most of the money could go to the two Sneiderman children and not to attorneys.