Libertarian candidate trying to force runoff in governor's race

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ATLANTA —

The libertarian candidate in the Georgia governor's race is trying to force a runoff that could delay the outcome until December.

Newcomer Andrew Hunt spoke to Channel 2’s Lori Geary about his background and reasons for running for governor. 

“I have a PhD in material sciences and engineering from Georgia Tech.  I immediately started up a nontechnology company, Hunt said.

 Hunt is not the typical candidate for governor, because it is his first run for political office.

It's his first run for political office. 

“The reason I did, the majority of the people who are polled say they're dissatisfied with both parties,” he said. 

Hunt said he knows he has an uphill climb but wants to force a runoff in Georgia’s governor's race.

The two leading candidates, Republican incumbent Gov. Nathan Deal and democrat Jason Carter are fighting it out on the airwaves and in interviews. 

 Hunt said his main issue is wasteful spending and points to the massive overhaul of the Interstate 285/Georgia 400 interchange.

“That’s going to be $1 billion that's going to tie up traffic for years, rather than putting it into light sequencing systems which alleviate traffic much quicker and smoother,” Hunt said.

Political analyst Bill Crane said he cannot remember when a third-party candidate forced a runoff in the Georgia governor's race, but said it is possible and looks to the 2008 senate race between Sen. Saxby Chambliss and democrat Jim Martin. 

“It’s not so much Libertarians are a major force but it's if that single digit number is enough in a close race to force a runoff,” Crane said.

“It’s not going to be that close, we're going to win,” Deal said when asked about the thought of a runoff.