GSP Trooper involved in fatal NYE crash fired

Updated:

The wife of an Atlanta Braves trainer is killed when a state trooper hit her family’s SUV while responding to a call, authorities say.

ATLANTA,None - The Georgia State Patrol trooper who crashed into the car of an Atlanta Braves trainer, killing the trainer's wife, has been fired.

The GSP issued a statement on Friday stating that an investigation into the crash has been launched and that trooper Donald Crozier has been fired. According to the statement, charges will be considered against Crozier at the conclusion of the investigation.

Crozier was involved in a crash at the intersection of Capitol Avenue and Memorial Drive around 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 31.
At the time of the crash, GSP said Crozier was on his way to a police chase on Interstate 20 with his lights and sirens on when his cruiser hit and SUV driven by Braves trainer Jeff Porter.

Porter, his 19-year-old son, and his 18-year-old friend were injured, but Kathy Porter was killed in the crash.



Troopers now say their preliminary investigation has determined Crozier was speeding and ran a red light before crashing into the family's SUV.

The report indicates Crozier failed to use due regard when traveling through an intersection on a red light.

Witnesses told Channel 2 Action News that they did not hear any sirens and that the trooper did not slow down as he approached the intersection.

GSP also released the crash report on Friday.

According to the report, witnesses told the GSP the trooper was traveling at a high rate of speed with his lights on on Memorial Drive and went through the red light at Capitol Avenue.

Investigators said they obtained audio and video from the time before the crash from the trooper's vehicle. The also obtained audio of the crash, but were unable to get the video due to damages to the cruiser in the crash.

Channel 2s Tom Jones talked to a former Atlanta Police Officer who said just because there's an emergency, that doesn't mean an officer can disregard public safety, especially when going through an intersection.

"He has to come to a full and complete stop and make sure traffic is going to stop and then he could proceed," Tony Corroto said.