Documents: Courthouse shooter may have been planning attack for days



FORSYTH COUNTY, Ga. - The Forsyth County sheriff says they are still trying to pinpoint what motivated gunman Dennis Marx to lash out on the Forsyth County courthouse last week.

Friday, Marx showed up at the Forsyth County Courthouse and opened fire, hitting sheriff's Corp. Daniel Rush in the leg. Marx was then shot and killed by deputies.

New information shows Marx may have been planning the attack for some time. 

Kavanaugh uncovered a quitclaim deed Marx filed just two days before he tried to storm the courthouse. According to Kavanaugh, the documents show he put the deed in his mother’s name, Jacqueline Denison. It was executed originally in October, but only filed June 4th. Investigators say they are working to find out if anyone else knew what he had planned.

"He has a mother, a sister he's been in contact with, but there was no indication either one of them had any indication that this was going to happen," said Forsyth County Sheriff Duane Piper.

Investigators also said Marx was not part of any political group or movement.

“He was not a part of the sovereign citizens as far as we can find. Not an indication he was part of any group or planned this with anybody else,” Forsyth County Sheriff Duane Piper told Channel 2's Kerry Kavanaugh.

Kavanaugh also got her hands on the 911 tapes and radio traffic between deputies from the moments after the shooting. She says the whole situation ended so quickly there were only a handful of calls, but in those you can hear the panic that unfolded at the courthouse.

The first call came from Rush himself.

“I got shots fired. I got shots fired,” yelled Rush.

The dispatch traffic got busier from there as the situation began to unfold.

“We got a vehicle that just drove up on the side walk.”

“Shots fired.”

“Radio, I don't have any visual. We have pepper gas going off at the front entrance to the courthouse, the front entrance.”

"More shots fired. Tear gas has been deployed."

“Hold traffic everybody. I've got forward movement, appears to be heavily armed, flash bangs. He's fixing to throw another one.”

As deputies scrambled to respond to the radio calls witnesses began calling 911.

"At the courthouse -- some man just opened fire at the officer in front of the court house, “said one caller. “And, be careful because he let out a spike strip on the road."

The first deputy to encounter Marx was Rush.

“Radio, we have one deputy down. Gunshot wound to the leg,” said one deputy.

Rush is recovering from his wound. Marx did not survive the gun battle.

“Take cover, automatic fire. Radio, he's down. He's down,” said a deputy as Marx was shot.

Piper says they may not yet know why Marx did what he did, but they believe he planned to do a lot more.

“We are certain that he wanted to harm other people, hold them captive and kill them based on what he had with him,” said Piper.

We uncovered documents showing Marx spent the last three years fighting marijuana-related charges that stemmed from a 2011 SWAT raid of his Cumming home.  Marx was suing the department claiming excessive force and violation of his civil rights during that raid.

Despite those facts, Piper says no one saw this coming.

“Nothing at all to indicate exactly what triggered him to do this,” said Piper.

The director of the county 911 center said her staff went to active shooter training just a week ago. They believe it was vital to properly handle this incident.

The community in Forsyth County is holding several fundraisers supporting Corporal Rush.

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