Voters say 6th District border lines are confusing

By: Liz Artz

Updated:

DEKALB COUNTY, Ga. - The countdown is on for voters to cast their ballots on the hotly contested 6th District Congressional race.

The district encompasses parts of Cobb, DeKalb and Fulton counties.                 

Channel 2's Liz Artz talked with residents of one DeKalb County neighborhood who said the lines for the district are confusing.

Artz noticed numerous campaign signs as soon as she drove through the neighborhood, but she quickly learned that just because one neighbor may be voting in Tuesday’s election, those across the street may not live in the same district.

"It's just very bizarre that a small little neighborhood like this is drawn right down the middle," neighbor Cindy Dobbins told Artz.

If you look at a map of the 6th Congressional District, you can see exactly what Dobbins is talking about. The district border goes straight down the middle of her road.  

"So many people are confused as to which district we are in," Dobbins told Artz.

That's because in some cases one side of the street is in the 6th District and the other side of the road is in another district all together.

"It's little squiggly lines that's almost like it goes up and takes one little section and then leaves all the rest out," Dobbins said.

Dobbins called the border lines in entire district bizarre.

The whole 6th District is illogical. It just seems like the districts would be drawn along commercial lines,"
Dobbins said.

Poll worker Pam McKee said she alerted residents in her neighborhood to check before going to vote.

SPECIAL SECTION: The 6th District Race

Weather App

She said during the general election, one in four voters were turned away because they live in a different district.

"It's just really crazy," McKee told Artz. "People were very angry. And they were angry because they said they had been bombarded with phone calls and mail, and they weren't even in that district."

The 6th Congressional race is the highly-anticipated runoff between Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff.

The showdown is the most expensive House race in U.S. history with polls showing the clash between Ossoff and Handel too close to call.

"I think it is a very important election. I think it's going to send a message in many ways," Dobbins said.

Voters just need to be aware of their district. McKee recommends going to "My Voter Page" on the Secretary of State’s website and filling out the information. The site will then you what congressional district you live in.

Next Up: