• City of Clarkston says executive order will affect the city

    By: Carl Willis

    Updated:

    CLARKSTON, Ga. - As countrywide protests against the president's temporary travel ban persist, the refugee welcoming city of Clarkston, known as the "Ellis Island of the South," discussed the executive order's impact on their own community Tuesday night.

    "It's going to affect jobs. Most of all, it's going to affect families," former Clarkston Mayor Emanuel Ransom told Channel 2’s Carl Willis.

    The executive order signed by President Trump calls for suspension of immigration from Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya.

    Muslim refugees are also not to be admitted while the government reviews the application process.

    Some of those speaking out Tuesday night take issue with order, including American citizen Birendra Dhakal, who fled Bhutan in 2001.


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    "Don't try to label us as terrorists coming to this country just for nothing. I think this is very unfortunate,” Dhakal told Willis.

    He was just one in the crowd concerned about the temporary suspension of travelers from the seven Muslim-majority countries.

    "This is not, I repeat not, a ban on Muslims," newly appointed Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said.

    But not everyone agrees with him.

    Clarkston City Council member Ahmed Hassan, who is originally from Somalia, called the order discriminatory.

    "This executive order is really unfair and it is religious discrimination. But still, I’m not angry for this administration," Hassan said.

    Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry said the city's stance is firm.

    "America can and should take in more refugees, not less," Terry said.

    "It's we the people that make up the United States," Clarkston City Council member Beverly Burks said.

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