Rental mansion owner surprised by rave invitation

by: Tony Thomas Updated:

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DAWSON COUNTY, Ga. —

A big rave dance party scheduled for Halloween has been moved after the owners of a Dawson County resort found out the plans of what was to go on there.

Across the Internet, plans were hyped for the Rave at Camp Crystal Lake Mansion. It was getting so big organizers were offering free shuttle buses from Gwinnett County, midtown Atlanta and Kennesaw State University.

The event has been moved, but the owners of the house and property manager still fear a large crowd will show up at the resort.

"It could be a disaster. I don't know what they were thinking," property manager Edwin Alexander said about the Rave plans he discovered only after trying to do a background check on the man who had rented the 45-acre resort for Oct. 29-31.

He said he rented the house to Luke Blavescuinas, who wrote on the application that it would just be four couples and two kids coming over the holiday.

Then Alexander spotted Facebook postings and a website advertising the biggest Rave/House Party of the year. All the money raised was supposed to be donated to the Wounded Warrior Project.

The websites list an overnight party with DJ's, costumes, beer and fireworks.

"They are billing this as the zombie apocalypse," Alexander said.

As of Wednesday evening, a Facebook page showed nearly 1,900 people saying they would come and another 24,000 invites outstanding.

Alexander and local authorities are trying to put the word out that the rave has been moved.

"Don't come. There will be no party here, no rave. The gates will be closed," Alexander said.

Channel 2's Tony Thomas caught up with organizer Luke Blavescuinas at his Lawrenceville home Wednesday night.

"I'm sorry, I tried. I didn't try to deceive anybody, "Blavescuinas said.

Blavescuinas said all the money raised at the event is going to the charity. He said he and his friends had spent a lot of money arranging the event they had just begun planning this past summer.

He said what began as just a few dozen friends, ballooned in recent weeks to a mega event.

"It was nothing that we couldn't control. We had security hired. We had people who were going to be walking around all the time. Just making sure nothing was getting out of hand," Blavescuinas said.

Alexander and the owners of the Dawson County property said they just hope word spreads of the move as fast as the invites.

"It's a recipe for disaster. I don't know what they were thinking," he said.